Blowing My Trumpet Over Grammatical Errors That Jerk Me Out Of A Story

Gabriel Sounds His Horn

Recently, I’ve read e-books with so many grammatical errors I’m jerked right out of the story. Then I’m on a quest looking for the next mistake. I’m not going to harp on the need for an editor because that’s obvious. What I think I’m reading is an author who writes like he or she speaks. If a writer’s grammar and syntax are poor when they are speaking, it’s probably the same when they write.
Here are some examples of  mistakes I’ve seen recently with the use of I, he, she, me, him, and her:

 

 

Nothing further was said about Jenna, the relationship with her mom, Lander, what the verdict was in the make-believe case her and Jacque took part in, etc~~~
Ashley was one of the echo techs and her and Tom had been having a rampart affair for months.~~~
After Ty and me left the bar, me and him decided to get a meal.
(The character was a school teacher)~~~
Use he or she as the subject of a sentence. She was having an affair.
Use him or her as the object of an action. She left her husband for him.
The rule is the same when the subject is more than one person:
He and I decided to get a meal. – Correct
Him and me decided to get a meal. – Wrong!
Confused?
Try separating the sentence or taking out the second person.
Example: Him and me decided to get a meal.
Separate the sentence.

Him decided to get a meal. Me decided to get a meal.

Doesn’t sound or read right does it?

Try this. I decided to get a meal. He decided to get a meal.

Now put it together like this. He and I decided to get a meal. Better isn’t it?
Do unintentional grammatical errors in novels irritate you?
Share your feelings!
For further study go to grammarly.com or consult  Elements of Style by White and Strunk

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3 thoughts on “Blowing My Trumpet Over Grammatical Errors That Jerk Me Out Of A Story

  1. Well said, I have caught some errors on occasion on my blog, but I don’t put it out as a book, and what you are describing is rather elementary. These are the very things that get teachers and students and schools labeled as not meeting expectations. Great post!

    Like

    • I’ve just provided a few examples. Don’t get me started on the spelling and poor use of words that spell check doesn’t catch. Thanks for commenting.

      Like

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