Places To See In The Charleston,S.C. Area-Part III

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A glimpse of the gardens at Boone Hall

On a sunny day in April, I visited Boone Hall Plantation,  in Mt. Pleasant,S.C., a plantation popular with tourists. Prior to visiting Boone Hall, we stopped at Christ Episcopal Church where we once were members. Located on Highway 17 it is just across the road that leads to Boone Hall. Christ Church is over 300 years old and was one of 10 parishes created by the Church Act of 1706. The Historic Church was finished in 1727. British troops burned it in 1782, and it was rebuilt six years later. Near the end of the Civil War a company of Union cavalry, from the 21st Massachusetts Colored Regiment  used the building as a stable. They burned the pews for firewood in the bitter winter of 1865. A silver chalice (1680) and other communion vessels were hidden during the years of war and occupation and are on display in the Charleston Museum.

John Thomas Boone, an Indian Trader, received the land known as Boone Hall Plantation as a grant from the Eight Lord Proprietors in 1681. The Boone’s began growing indigo, and thus began a long history of providing Boone Hall crops for the South Carolina low country.

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Avenue of oaks

In 1743, the son of Major John Boone planted live oak trees, arranging them in two evenly spaced rows. This spectacular approach to his home, a symbol of southern heritage, is one of the first things I think of when I remember Boone Hall. It took two centuries for the massive, moss-draped branches to meet overhead, forming today’s natural corridor and a scene that NBC Daytime television says is “a must see stop on any trip to Charleston, S.C.”

As we drove down this driveway, there were red poppies at the entrance and horses in the field to the right.2014-04-25 13.55.51

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red poppies at entrance to Boone Hall

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As we neared the end of the driveway a lane led to the Cotton Dock where many weddings are held. Blake Lively and Ryan Reynolds married here. The day we visited a wedding was in progress.2014-04-25 14.37.422014-04-25 14.37.26

Further down on the left brick slave cabins stood like sentries to the past.2014-04-25 13.59.182014-04-25 15.20.24

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Gates of Boone Hall

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Straight ahead was the house with the ironwork gates.

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End of the Driveway-Boone Hall

 

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During the filming of The Notebook, Ryan Gosling ran into the gate when he cut too short on the turn into the entrance. The story is he didn’t miss a beat. He jumped from the car and raced by foot up the driveway to Rachel McAdams. To the right and left of the driveway leading to the house are the gardens.

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To the right of the house which is not the original house (it was rebuilt in the 1930’s) is the Gin which is under renovation as well as a visitors center and snack bar. Trams leave this area for tours of the plantation.
Inside the home are artifacts of the original plantation and land grant. Only two rooms are shown with the exception of the artifact room and its historical information.

The patio leads to the grounds where a scene from Gone With The Wind was filmed. Another film that used the grounds was North and South starring Patrick Swayze. The plantation has become a popular site for the film and television industry.

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Marsh

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cotton patch display

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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creek at Boone Hall

creek at Boone Hall

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Leaving Boone Hall

As we left the house, we wandered through the gardens before making our way to the Boone Hall Farms Market to pick up vegetables and strawberries..

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